Transcendental Meditation Is Tailor Made for On-the-Go Millennials

TM is an adaptable, natural, and effective form of meditation that suits a fast-paced millennial lifestyle.  Ethan Jacobs March 29, 2016 Aspecific form of meditation called Transcendental Meditation has experienced a resurgence in popularity in recent years, and it’s probably because it’s a product well-tailored to a younger market and headspace. In February of 2015, the American Psychological Association published a study that found millennials — defined as people between the ages of 18 and 35 — experience more stress than other generations. While the increased levels of stress in the millennial generation can be attributed to a slew of contributing factors like money and work — that also affect other groups — the study concluded that increased optionality is a specific detriment to millennials. Growing up, we espoused our parents’ encouragement that we could do anything, as opposed to our parents who were advised that working hard would lead to a secure job and happiness. In that way, millennials are more entitled than previous generations. We think we can have more, although we might not necessarily deserve it. The increased ability to choose is one of the greatest privileges we experience as a generation, but it has also proven to be a major source of stress. So let’s make things easier for those of you who can’t choose — cut out the numerous other methods of meditation and try Transcendental Meditation, a simple and natural way to quiet the mind. The word transcend simply means “to go beyond,” which is exactly what TM teaches. Sarah Anderson, a certified TM specialist and long-time teacher, says the driving goal of...
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Should schools teach kids how to meditate?

Should schools teach kids how to meditate? ​   (NEWS CENTER) — Parents know how stressed their kids can get, juggling school work, extracurricular activities and making friends. Everybody has their own way of dealing with that stress, and some schools are teaching an unconventional technique to students: meditation. Twice a week at Rosemont Nursery School in Portland, the normal chaos and noise of a preschool subsides, and kids sit down for 45 minutes of meditation and yoga. Cayce Lannon, founder of Maine Yoga Kids, is teaching them to find their center. “Parents sometimes say, ‘What do you mean they’re going to sit and mediate and do yoga?’ They just can’t imagine what that looks like,” she said. Lannon doesn’t expect the kids to sit still or do exactly what she’s saying all the time. She does try to keep them entertained with singing, dancing and coloring. It looks like fun, but are the kids really getting anything out of it? Brain scans show the difference between novice and expert meditators’ brains during rest and during meditation.   (Photo: Custom) Dr. Karen Houseknect, a pharmacology professor at the University of New England and a long time meditator, admits people can be skeptical about meditating, because of the stereotypes. They want science, like brain scans, to back it up. Scientists haven’t been studying meditation long enough to prove all of its benefits, Houseknecht said, but science does show meditation can potentially prevent your brain from getting altered by chronic stress. “Meditation has been shown to lower stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline, that fight or flight response,” she said. “Overtime,...