Transcendental Meditation Is Tailor Made for On-the-Go Millennials

TM is an adaptable, natural, and effective form of meditation that suits a fast-paced millennial lifestyle.  Ethan Jacobs March 29, 2016 Aspecific form of meditation called Transcendental Meditation has experienced a resurgence in popularity in recent years, and it’s probably because it’s a product well-tailored to a younger market and headspace. In February of 2015, the American Psychological Association published a study that found millennials — defined as people between the ages of 18 and 35 — experience more stress than other generations. While the increased levels of stress in the millennial generation can be attributed to a slew of contributing factors like money and work — that also affect other groups — the study concluded that increased optionality is a specific detriment to millennials. Growing up, we espoused our parents’ encouragement that we could do anything, as opposed to our parents who were advised that working hard would lead to a secure job and happiness. In that way, millennials are more entitled than previous generations. We think we can have more, although we might not necessarily deserve it. The increased ability to choose is one of the greatest privileges we experience as a generation, but it has also proven to be a major source of stress. So let’s make things easier for those of you who can’t choose — cut out the numerous other methods of meditation and try Transcendental Meditation, a simple and natural way to quiet the mind. The word transcend simply means “to go beyond,” which is exactly what TM teaches. Sarah Anderson, a certified TM specialist and long-time teacher, says the driving goal of...

Increase work productivity and beat stress with meditation

MEDITATION Stress by CONTENT SPONSORED & CREATED BY POIKE/ISTOCK.COM Meditation boosts brain function and reduces anxiety. MARCH 22, 2016 Increase work productivity and beat stress with meditation BY INDEPENDENCE BLUE CROSS Meditation isn’t just a New Age tool; it is as important to your well-being as eating right or exercising. Many studies have shown how drastic the benefits of meditation truly are, revealing that mindfulness is more relevant to the workplace than you may think. Here are some tips on how to get through your day like a yogi, while being as productive as a master of the universe. What is mindfulness? Mindfulness, or the ability to remain fully present of your physical body, issuggested to sharpen attention, memory and emotional intelligence. CEOs do it Meditation is an integral part of life for even the busiest of people, CEOs and senior executives. Many CEOs are drawn to meditation for its benefit of developing leadership skills, and internal mindfulness courses are being created with the intent of “creating agile and flexible mindsets as a foundation for leadership.”Meditation provides you with the stamina to balance patience, flexibility and an ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes. Meditation boosts brain function A study from Harvard that examined the relationship between a wandering mind and happiness revealed that the mind wanders about 46.9 percent of the time. This statistic, along with everyday work interruptions from phone calls and emails, paints a dark picture of the lack of focus that exists at many workplaces. Fortunately, mindfulness is not only useful for business leaders to better manage their day. Studies have found that mindfulness training improved working...

Mindful meditation may be the answer to relieving chronic back pain, study suggests

I have a personal affection for this article, I also suffer from back pain and over the six months or more I have been mediating regularly and have found a real reduction in pain through meditation.  Glad to see that good research is going on in this field.  What’s funnier is that the below photo looks like me but years younger. Matt Geise By Ariana Eunjung Cha March 22 at 1:50 PM (iStock photo) In 1992, Harvard neuroscientist Richard Davidson embarked on an unusual research project to study the brains of Buddhist monks who spent thousands of hours meditating. What he found was that not only did the practice activate different parts of the brain, it also seemed to impact the body in ways that matter for health. That pivotal study has led to a number of research projects in recent years that look at what calming the brain does for specific medical conditions and diseases. The results of one of those studies is out Tuesday in JAMA. It looks at adults with chronic low back pain, one of the leading cause of disabilities in the United States and one reason why more and more people are addicted to painkillers. Led by Daniel C. Cherkin of Group Health Research Institute in Seattle, the experiment involved randomly assigning 342 adults with the condition to meditate, talk with a psychologist or continue with their normal techniques for addressing the pain, such as  medication. The first group engaged in yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), which focuses on being aware of and accepting physical discomfort. The second group participated in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) to change pain-related thoughts and behaviors during eight weekly 2-hour group sessions....