The Family Meditation Session

The Family Meditation Session Stress relief for all; children are taught to imitate a frog Can teaching your children how to meditate at an early age positively affect their life? Sue Shellenbarger joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero to discuss. Above, Amy Wright Glenn, a yoga teacher from Pompano Beach, Fla., and her son Taber Glenn, who was 2 years old at the time. Taber sometimes imitated Ms. Glenn meditating, sitting beside her with legs folded, saying, ‘Mommy, I meditate too.’Photo: Erin Simpson-Krar By SUE SHELLENBARGER Nov. 17, 2015 1:40 p.m. ET 12 COMMENTS Asking a child to sit still for meditation doesn’t sound like a recipe for easing stress. Yet more families are making a few shared minutes of quiet contemplation a part of their daily routines. When handled with flexibility and a sense of humor, they say, the practice can calm their children, reduce stress and anxiety and help them focus. Meditation is increasingly taught in the West as a secular discipline aimed at gaining awareness, or mindfulness—the ability to notice and focus calmly on thoughts and feelings as they arise, without reacting or judging. More than two dozen books on mindfulness training for children and teens have been published in the last three years. A growing number of schools are teaching mindfulness. A 12-week program of mindfulness training was linked to improvements in children’s ability to pay attention and control their emotions, and to reductions in stress, depression symptoms and aggression, according to a controlled study of 99 fourth and fifth-graders published last January in Developmental Psychology. The study is one of dozens in the past...

Five things you didn’t know about meditation

Five things you didn’t know about meditation Brooke Evans-Butler November 23, 2015, 2:00 pm Picture: The benefits of meditation on stress levels and overall health are generally well known. So you might be surprised to learn that taking some time out to get in the mediation zone can help in even more ways. Today we look at five things you may not know about meditation: 1. Anti-Ageing You might not want to skip the anti-wrinkle eye cream just yet but according to Karen Civello, founder of KalyaaNa Spa & Wellness Retreat, meditation can assist with anti-ageing. “Ageing occurs due to the deterioration of the endocrine system. However, people who meditate regularly produce 100 per cent more dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) than people who do not meditate. DHEA is produced in the adrenal glands and is said to counteract the ageing process,” Ms Civello explains. She adds meditation can cause your adrenal glands to produce less cortisol, one of the main hormones responsible for ageing. In addition, she says a study by Elizabeth A. Hoge, assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, found people who meditated daily for at least four years had longer telomeres (the protective caps at the end of chromosomes) than people who did not meditate. “Short telomeres are believed to be markers of accelerated ageing,” Ms Civello says. 2. feel-good FACTOR Do you feel uncharitable or aloof by the end of the year? Ms Civello says compassion meditation (where you say repetitive phrases such as “may you be well”, “may you be healthy” and “may you be at ease”, for example) can help us to think of...

9 executives who practise meditation

Many studies have attested to the power of meditation. It’s a practice that helps protect the brain from ageing, rivals antidepressants for tackling anxiety and depression, improves attention and concentration and can even help fight addiction. Moreover, leaders turn to meditation to help them focus, keep calm and make better decisions. These nine executives are all converts to the calming art. 1. Marc Benioff – Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Salesforce In a 2005 San Francisco Chronicle article, Marc Benioff discussed his long-term relationship with meditation.     2. Arianna Huffington – President and Editor-in-Chief, the Huffington Post Media Group Arianna offers weekly classes for AOL and Huffington Post employees. She describes her early morning yoga and meditation as two of her “joy triggers” in a 2011 Vogue article. She wrote recently on a blog:   3.  Bill George – Senior Fellow, Harvard Business School Bill George told Bloomberg News that he uses meditation to recharge during travels. Padmasree Warrior spends her Saturdays doing a “digital detox” and meditates every night. She told the New York Times in 2012 that meditation helps her manage all aspects of her professional life: 5. Rick Goings – Chairman and CEO, Tupperware Brands Corporation Rick Goings aims to meditate for at least 20 minutes every afternoon, according to the Financial Times.  6. Larry Brilliant – President, Skoll Global Threats Fund The former director of Google.org, lived in a Himalayan ashram for two years practising meditation. In his 2013 commencement address, he discussed how his guru inspired him to join the World Health Organization. In an interview, Ray Dalio talks about how meditation is crucial in his life and how it helped him reach success.  8. Nouriel Roubini – Professor of Economics and International Business, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, New York University Economist Nouriel Roubini revealed on Twitter his new...