Letting Go? Four Simple Tips and a Meditation Practice to Get It Done Smoothly

  “Let Go! Take a deep breath and just release it all out!” As I said these words in my recent meditation talks in LA, a curious seeker looked at me as if I said something in an alien language. I repeated, and again she looked at me with the same haunting eyes. Before I could sense what’s going on, she walked up to me at the end of talk and poured her pain, “Chandresh, sometimes breathing doesn’t help to let go! It is…” and her throat choked with emotions. It isn’t the first time that I witnessed this pain in letting go. It happens to all of us at some point. The breathing helps but I clearly understand that sometimes it isn’t enough. Sometimes, you need a little more than breathing. Here are my four tips to help you letting go: 1. Honor your existence. Many people may like the idea of having you but may not be able to handle the real you. If people only see your mistakes, if they take you for granted always, if they don’t value your presence, then they have to go. The more you honor your existence, the more kind people will walk into your life. 2. Don’t built hate and anger. Although hate and anger could be natural responses in these situations, they don’t serve you in any way. Such emotions only multiply the pain within. By getting angry, you make it even tougher to let go. Ever tried holding water tight in hands? Tried sand? Some things require you to be gentle and mindful. Only then, they make a...

The Importance of Meditation for Investment Professionals

Meditation is not a practice historically associated with the finance industry. Yet with investing legends like Ray Dalio and Bill Gross, CFA, embracing the discipline and business schools adding it to their curriculum, it is becoming an increasingly meaningful tool in the investment toolkit. Ng Kok Song, former group chief investment officer of the Government of Singapore Investment Corporation (GIC), and Jason Voss, CFA, discuss the value meditation can bring to investors, both personally and professionally, in a recent Take 15 interview. “Meditation is about coming to a profound stillness of body and spirit,” Ng says. “This is not a new age phenomenon — when you meditate, we are entering a tradition . . . it’s important to understand that we are tapping into a wisdom tradition which has existed for thousands of years.”   One of the central components of meditation is the sounding of a word, or mantra, to center attention. “You will find that this is very challenging, because your mind is constantly distracted, it is constantly wandering,” Ng says. “The key to it is that as soon as you discover that you are distracted, and you are not sounding the mantra, drop whatever distracting thoughts they are and just humbly return to sounding the mantra faithfully.” Ng says that understanding meditation as a discipline is crucial, and identifies three essential aspects to the practice. “First of all, there is the discipline of committing the time [to] meditation every day; secondly, there is the discipline of learning to sit still; and thirdly, the discipline of humbly sounding the mantra and being content to sound it, leaving behind all...

Why some schools are making time for meditation

Why some schools are making time for meditation Editor’s note: This is part of  an occasional series on healthy schools. Full disclosure, I mediate almost every day, and I’m in good company.  Each year more and more people, from super star athletes to successful CEOs, are attributing at least part of their success to a regular meditation practice.  For me, meditation helps keep me present and reduces my stress level, and existing research supports those benefits. A recent analysis concluded that adults participating in mindfulness mediation programs show reduced anxiety, depression, and pain. Now, schools are getting in on the mindfulness and meditation trend, and many schools around the country are finding time for meditation, silence, and stillness. But what do we mean when we talk about meditation? There are several terms that refer to the practice, and the research on effectiveness defines them this way: Mindfulness: Deliberately focusing attention to the present moment, without judgement to the experience that unfolds. Essentially, you are attending to the present moment and the feelings that arise,  without resistance to those feelings, and specifically teaching children to be aware of the ways they are thinking and feeling in that specific moment. This can help build strategies to deal with past difficulties, future anxieties, and resilience when the current moment is stressful. Mindfulness-based stress stress-reduction programs: Programs utilizing various forms of mindfulness mediation such as breath awareness, body scan exercises, walking, and yoga. These practices in school can help improve students’ self-monitoring of behavior, emotions, and sensations which will help them become aware and responsible for their actions and corresponding emotions. Transcendental meditation:...